THE DRESSING ROOM

In The Dressing Room we create an intimate space for the viewer to explore firsthand. Humaira Abid’s alluring sculptures are so meticulously detailed and so life-like that you will be tempted to start ironing with them or take out one of her wooden shirts from Breakdown in the Closet and walk away wearing it.

In her practice, Abid has invariably dealt with lending new contexts to everyday objects; she also addresses taboo and controversial subjects, often breaking stereotypes. Carving deep into blocks of mahogany and pinewood, she combines labour intensive techniques; painting on her pieces in the miniature style with gouache, almost like a three dimensional canvas. As you walk around the installation, we intend to give you the illusion of an intimate space where the protagonist has just left the room.

The objects that are left behind – the vanity with an unfinished cup of tea, the luggage pieces in Searching for Home, and so on, are all painstakingly crafted by hand and skillfully executed.
The viewer gets a sense of the personality who inhabits the space and is very much affected by what is happening around them. Their sentiments are palpable as you walk around the installation and you become part of the story. As this sinks in, you may be overwhelmed with feelings of loss, identity,migration and transience.

Abid’s practice is layered in connotation, dealing with universal subjects as well as working through very personal themes. For instance, she provokes the viewer into thinking about what the significance of the colour Red is. Does it symbolise love or anger,passion or violence? Perhaps all of these combined? And I Was Seeking Equality in Love illustrates these double meanings
beautifully.

THE DRESSING ROOM